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How to Spring Forward Your Finances

Daylight Savings Time begins on March 12 this year and as we move into the Spring season this day has always reminded me to take a moment to spring forward our finances. There are many things that can distract us in our daily lives so it’s important to use days like these to remind us to take time to evaluate our financial situations and set goals.

I’ve always found springtime to be an easier period to reevaluating financial relationships and assessing financial goals. I feel this way because the sun is out a little longer and the warm weather brings with it a better mood.

Today, I am the guest for #CashChat a weekly Twitter chat hosted by the amazing Tarra “Ms. Madam Money” Jackson, a good friend and colleague.

I’m challenging you all to a 238 day of Daylight Savings. The prize? Your savings account after the challenge is over.

The goal of course is ingraining the habit of savings well before the holiday spending season begins which coincidently is when DST ends on November 2nd.

4 Ways to Save During Daylight Savings Time

(originally appeared on phroogal.com)

1. Set a savings goal. Set a savings goal that you’d like to achieve by November 1st. It might be funds for the holiday gift list, a winter vacation or simply challenge yourself to see if you can set a financial goal and achieve it.

2. Transfer a dollar a day. If saving is something you haven’t done, start by depositing or transferring $1 each day into a savings account. Don’t cheat by depositing $7 for an entire week. The idea is for you to become aware of your savings account and ingrain a habit of depositing into it. One dollar doesn’t seem a lot but think of it as an exercise. The small amounts lead to larger weights…er…um…dollar amounts.

This exercise is great for children too. Give your child a dollar and have them place it in a savings jar. If you’re tech savvy, show your child how money is transferred from your account into their savings account online.

3. Save $5 a day by cutting out a daily treat. If you’re like me you might be spending $5 on coffee at your favorite cafe. During DST, goal yourself to save $5 per day and place that amount into a savings account. By the end of Daylight Savings Time, you’ll see a savings account with $1190.

4. Lower monthly expenses. Spring into action and cut out unnecessary monthly payments. Call up your cellular company, cable, gas and oil providers and ask for a discount or learn about new deals that can save you money. Any dollars you save on bills is then transferred into a savings account.

We all know the importance of savings and there are many ways to save. The motivation to save is just a latent one so we do need clever ideas to get the savings mojo going.

What are some of your ideas to save during Daylight Savings Time?

Thank you all so much for joining us and stay in touch. Make sure you subscribe to the newsletter and check out my bestselling and The New York Times reviewed book, You Only Live Once: The Roadmap to Financial Wellness and a Purposeful Life

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